What We are Reading: January

WWR

Camille

Hitler’s Art Thief is one I picked up on a whim at the library and I am really enjoying.  It blends history, art history, and intrigue in a true story that is so well researched. I like it because it is the perspective of Germans during WWII, while so many other books are written from the perspective of the allied powers.  All the Light We Cannot See blended the two well and that sparked my interest in this book as well.

I am not sure yet about Little Bookstore of Big Stone Gap.  I started it, but it is moving slowly.  It does have a strong recommendation so I think I’ll give it a few more chapters to make my decision.  Have you read it?  I’d love to hear your thoughts.

With the kids…

Do I lose some sort of credibility if I admit that I’ve never read  The Hobbit?  I am remedying that right now.  It is our nightly read aloud and we are all loving it.  Tolkien’s use of language is really remarkable, which you knew… because you’ve probably all read it…


The Long Winter – we are listening to this in the car, on cds from the library.  I just found out the series will be available on audible this February! All. seven. of. them!! I’m thrilled. These are certainly family favorites.  After moving back to a snowy climate, I thought this would be a perfect book to listen to in January, but our measly 1″ or less this month is really not holding a candle to the blizzards the Ingalls and Wilders dealt with.

Amy

I’ve been wanting to better my understanding of how Charlotte Mason approached the subject of math and how that aligns with modern research. This book has been so helpful. I have walked away inspired as a teacher! I can see how my “fixed mindset” held me back in math as a child and I want to do better with my own children. It’s also been great to see much of what Mason believed about how the brain works is continuing to be proven true.

Simplicity Parenting has been one of the most influential books I’ve read on parenting, so I was excited to read Kim John Payne’s more recent book, The Soul of Discipline, especially with a soon-to-be teenager in the house. His approach fits very nicely with Charlotte Mason’s idea of Masterly Inactivity.

 

Funny coincidence with Camille’s family…we are reading Farmer Boy at our afternoon Tea Time. One afternoon the description of their ham dinner with preserves, beans, bread, potatoes and pie had our mouth’s watering, we called Dad and asked him to bring home a ham and a pie! We’ve been having “farm dinners” on our menu rotation since!

 

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Resources for a Delightful Home

delightful-home

When we set out to begin this delightful home series, Amy and I really thought long and hard about why we would do it.  We discussed that we really wanted to share was a series of posts that would help you love your home, right where you are.  We have both recently moved (sadly, farther away from each other, rather than closer), and we’ve fully unpacked, but we needed to live there a while to really let it feel like home – to see how we use each room, what feels out of place, or what we’d like to adjust.  We’re sure you have similar adjustments you’d like to make and maybe you’re on the search for new ideas and to see how other homeschooling moms use their spaces.

We began to discuss the resources that we had used in the past to really bring order and joy to our spaces.  First and foremost, Amy and I both really liked The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up.  Sure, Kondo thanks her socks for their usefulness before puts them in the hamper and there are some other strange notions to avoid, but the overall message is a good one: Keep only the things that bring you joy through their beauty or usefulness.  It is amazing how much your home will change for the better when you implement that rule alone.  Add in a few other ideas for storage and space saving folding and suddenly you’ve freed up hours of your week because you don’t have to maintain and contain messes.

When you’ve decided on what to keep, there are best practices in organization.  The Complete Book of Home Organization really helps here.  (Her blog also has lots of inspiration and ideas!) Many times, we may have dishes stored across the kitchen from the dishwasher meaning tons of extra steps and wasted time when unloading or other similar inefficiencies.  We may store pans where they are buried under pots and being scratched and dented, and so disorder means having to spend more on replacements.  This book has many tips to keep things orderly, and before you know it, using and cleaning your rooms is so much quicker and easier.  We can also put into practice ideas to make chores easier for younger folks by keeping certain items in lower cabinets or drawers.

The book that taught Amy everything she knows about homemaking and, even more importantly, convinced her it was a worthwhile endeavor was Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House. I still remember hearing the NPR story our first year of marriage (yes, 1999) and then heading to the bookstore (there were still lots of those around back then!) to buy it.

When I was in the midst of having a whole gaggle of babies (3, 3 and under!), I would reread  A Mother’s Rule of Life: How to Bring Order to Your Home and Peace to Your Soul every couple months. Pierlot applies lessons from monastic living to motherhood and homemaking for a higher sense of vocation.

We also love Like Mother, Like Daughter, for her very practical approach to homekeeping. It is inspiring to read the wisdom of a woman who has raised seven children and has really reasonable advice for how clean a home should be and great advice to keep it so.

The Madame Chic books are refreshing and elevating. At Home with Madame Chic offers practical advice on “having a happy, fulfilling, and passionate life at home.” Jennifer Scott shares how a little planning and the little details go a long way in refining the tone of your home.

I also loved this 31 post series about having a Heart of Hospitality.  It reminded me that my home is not to be made beautiful in order to puff up my own pride, or to impress those who may see it, but rather I should have a home that is beautiful in order to offer beauty and hospitality to others.  To make them feel comfortable, welcomed, and loved. That goes for people who visit as well as those who live here.  I now think of my rooms as servants and ponder how they serve those who use each spot.

Along those lines is also the book, A Life Giving Home by Sally and Sarah Clarkson.  It is lovely and was the book we used last year to guide our monthly chats.  There is a lot to enjoy about their story as well as the home life the Clarksons aim for.

Lastly, while not a book or a blog, may I recommend, before starting on a path toward order to take a good hard look at your cleaning supplies?  A few months back, I realized that I disliked cleaning in part because my supply closet was disordered and full of ugly things. A neon broom that was frayed and cracked, a mop that was just not that good at the job it was supposed to do, etc.  Now might be a good time to check the tools of your trade. It may be time to freshen them up. If your mop and broom are in good working order, consider a fresh new caddy for your cleaning supplies and maybe some non-toxic cleaners. Something that is a joy to use and leaves your home cleaner will make the job so much easier.  As Mary Poppins says, “A spoon full of sugar helps the medicine go down.”  Then organize them in an attractive way.  A few tools neatly arranged on hooks can be pleasant to use and easy to put away.

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We kick off our month of the Kitchen in February.  I hope you’ll join us in decluttering, organizing, and beautifying one of the hardest working rooms in the house.  If you want to share your photos with us on Instagram or Facebook, we’re using the hashtag #delightfulhome2017

Mother Culture: What We are Reading

WWR

Amy is reading…

Natural History:


My husband bought this one for me! He heard about it on NPR on his morning drive to work. Heard that it was about Nature and Words and knew I’d like it. It’s fascinating. Part dictionary, part biography, part social commentary, part nature writing. It opens: “This is a book about the power of language–strong style, single words–to shape our sense of place.” Of course, I’d be hooked! The author notes the words that have been removed from the Oxford Junior Dictionary: acorn, adder, ash, beech, bluebell, buttercup, catkin, conker, cowslip, dandelion, fern, hazel, heatherto be replaced by broadband, celebrity, chatroom, cut-and-paste, voice-mail. Macfarlane has interesting things to say about what this says about our society and what it will say for its future. The Glossary he creates is lovely to read.

Parenting:


How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk was a birthday gift from my brother and Sister-n-law. I’ve tried a few of the simple practices mentioned and it does seem to help.

 Charlotte Mason:

Volume 1 Part 2. For the Charlotte Mason Reading Group I lead. I hope to write a follow-up post of complementary books and links to this wonderful section.

Volume 2. Chapter 1 and 2. For a second Charlotte Mason Reading Group that both Camille and I will participate in virtually! I’ve never done this Volume in a discussion Group so can’t wait!

Mason’s Ourselves. With my daughter Grace! She is starting this book for the first time.

A Touch of the Infinite: Studies in music Appreciation with Charlotte Mason by Megan Elizabeth Hoyt. I appreciate the careful research the author did for this work, of Mason’s volumes, but also the Mason archives and the books Mason references in her volumes and her programmes. I learned a lot and the book covers a lot! Composer Study, Hymns and Folksongs, Solfege and so much more. It has a great list of resources in the Appendix.

Literature:

Sigrid Undset’s Kristin Lavransdatter is one of my all-time favorites, so I decided to read another one of her trilogies. I’ve finished Volume 1 and now moving onto the second:


It has everything I love about Kristin: history, romance, the medieval church, beautifully crafted characters…

Fun Fiction:

If you are looking for an enjoyable, easy read that is refreshing and thought-provoking, this is it! If you’ve wondered what the “Benedict Option” could look like, this is the book for you. It has homeschooling, Latin, Chesterton, discussions on feminism, hospitality, Little Women, marriage, and beauty. I found myself reading quotes aloud to my husband again and again!

Family Read-Alouds During Lunch:

I alternate between Animal Farm and Winter in the Willows (a sequel of Wind in the Willows written by another author)

With the Little Girls at Bed-time:

Betsy-Tacy. They love this sweet little book and often now play “Betsy-Tacy” throughout their day!

In the Car:

The Curious World of Calpurnia Tate. We are listening to this Audible book from the Newberry-Award winner, Jacqueline Kelly. I like this second novel even more than the first! I really think these books could fit in the “Nature Lore” category of a Mason curriculum. We all love it.

 

Camille is reading…

 

 

 

 

I got an unexpected email that it was finally my turn for The Cleaner of Chartes at the library.  Given that my library only lets you keep books for two weeks and there are no extensions if there is a waiting list, I’ve made this one a priority.  It is delightful so far (I’m about halfway through) – an interesting story that jumps from the early life to the current life of Agnes, a woman who was abandoned as a baby and was then raised in a convent.  She is unable to read or write due to some cognitive disability, but has other gifts that allow her to live her life independently far from anywhere that she ever called home.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had just finished Mere Motherhood. I did not expect it to be quite the page turner that it was and I was done in only two days.  It is probably the first time since my fourteen-month-old was born that I can claim I read a book in that short a time. It is a story of a homeschooling mother and one that any of us can easily relate to.  The initial enthusiasm, the doubts, the new babies, the trials, the excitement over milestones, and the worries over gaps.  Beautifully written and a lovely story.

 

For my book group at church, we are reading A Mother’s Rule of Life.  It’s a book I’ve read before, but needs to be reread every few years.  It helps me to frame my day in the way a religious order might – focusing on my core priorities first and making sure my schedule reflects what is most important to my vocation.

 

 

 

 

 

I am also trudging through Gilead.  I hate to even state it that way, but it is true.  The book is not long at all, and I really like it when I am reading it, but it is somewhat slow moving and I find myself picking up other books rather than this one when it is time to read.  I’ve read enough glowing recommendations to know I should persevere…

 

 

 

Lastly, I read this great little ebook, The Confident Homeschooler, to get me ready for the school year.  I found some really good and practical nuggets that have been serving me well so far.  Most of my educational reading is really more philosophical than practical, so this felt refreshing and enjoyable before our new year started.

Our Read Aloud:

Each night after the little ones are tucked in, the oldest two kids and I read one chapter per night before bed.  We’ve just started The Yearling.  This is one I missed in my youth and I’m excited to be reading it with them.